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Slota slams US politician’s concerns about Slovakia’s Language Act

A comment made by George Pataki, a leading representative of the U.S.Republican Party, indicating that the United States will be deeply concerned if Slovakia doesn't change its State Language Act, was mocked by Slovak National Party (SNS) chairman Ján Slota, commenting that he hoped that it was merely a personal opinion of Mr Pataki, otherwise it would make Slota laugh out loud, the TASR newswire reported on October 12.

A comment made by George Pataki, a leading representative of the U.S.
Republican Party, indicating that the United States will be deeply concerned if Slovakia doesn't change its State Language Act, was mocked by Slovak National Party (SNS) chairman Ján Slota, commenting that he hoped that it was merely a personal opinion of Mr Pataki, otherwise it would make Slota laugh out loud, the TASR newswire reported on October 12.

“It's absolutely outrageous that, thanks to the efforts made by ethnic-Hungarian SMK party, representatives of other countries should show off here and interfere in Slovakia's internal relations,” said Slota, adding that this is exactly the way Hungarian political officials used to come to Slovakia both “on official and unofficial terms.”

Speaking earlier in the day after meeting ethnic-Hungarian SMK party leader Pal Csáky, Pataki said that USA, the cradle of diversity and co-existence of minorities, will be disturbed if Slovakia doesn’t change the law.

“I'm not speaking on behalf of any political body, only for myself and for all Hungarians living in America, and for everyone who is aware of the importance of human rights and minority rights,” said the former governor of New York.

Slota also noted that the leader of Hungary's Fidesz party, Viktor Orban, is set to attend the SMK's congress on Saturday, with “SMK merely proving what SNS has been pointing to for quite a while - that SMK and Fidesz are political parties that are very closely linked to each other, have the same political interests in both Hungary and Slovakia, with their common feature being autonomy of southern Slovakia,” said Slota. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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