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Companies with optical networks in Slovakia

Slovak Telekom – Over the last two years the company has made its optical network available to more than 240,000 households and plans to increase this significantly. For now, the optical network is available in 12 Slovak towns: Banská Bystrica, Bratislava, Zvolen, Nitra, Trenčín, Žilina, Košice, Michalovce, Prešov, Poprad and – most recently connected – Stupava and Senica. Before the crisis the company allocated €66.4 million to the construction of its optical network and the crisis has left this budget unaffected.

Slovak Telekom – Over the last two years the company has made its optical network available to more than 240,000 households and plans to increase this significantly. For now, the optical network is available in 12 Slovak towns: Banská Bystrica, Bratislava, Zvolen, Nitra, Trenčín, Žilina, Košice, Michalovce, Prešov, Poprad and – most recently connected – Stupava and Senica. Before the crisis the company allocated €66.4 million to the construction of its optical network and the crisis has left this budget unaffected.

Orange Slovensko – It started building its network in 2001. It is now available to over 285,000 households in 14 towns across Slovakia. Orange says the number of customers using services on its optical network now exceeds 30,000. The company is continuing to extend its network, with Stupava and Senica to be connected in the near future.

UPC Broadband Slovakia – This cable operator entered the Slovak market in 1996. To begin with it used hybrid fibre coaxial cables and later started to also build an optical network. It currently operates optical cables in 20 cities.

Energotel – This company was set up with an aim to secure telecommunications and data services especially for its parent companies: electricity producer Slovenské Elektrárne; regional energy distributors ZSE, SSE and VSE; gas utility SPP; and Transpetrol. Energotel provides services across a network with a total length of over 3,500 km which actually spans the whole territory of Slovakia.

Železničné Telekomunikácie Bratislava – The railway company ŽSR started building optical lines as early as the middle of the 1990s along some stretches of railway. Later, Železničné Telekomunikácie Bratislava was launched by the railway company with the intention of using the existing telecommunication and IT infrastructure of ŽSR. Its optical network of 1,200 kilometres covers a significant portion of Slovakia. The southern backbone links Bratislava with Čierna nad Tisou and a northern backbone connecting Bratislava with Kosice via Žilina is currently under construction.

Slovanet – Last year the company invested extensively in its network with continued construction as well as the acquisition of local operators. 15,500 clients currently use its services via the optical network and another 6,000 via hybrid services.

Swan – Swan launched construction of its optical infrastructure in 2001. It is now about 300 kilometres long, of which over 100 km covers Bratislava. This year it plans to complete investment of €5 million in extending the existing optical backbone network.

GTS Slovakia – This company started to use its own optical network after it acquired Quadia DCT in late 2006. Since then it has doubled its length to 140 kilometres of optical fibres within Bratislava. It focuses mainly on corporate clients.


Source: Infoware magazine and companies


Topic: IT


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