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Flu season has not yet arrived in Slovakia

The epidemiological situation in Slovakia regarding the occurrence of influenza is rather favourable to date, in line with the usual situation during the flu season, the chief public health officer Ivan Rovný was reported as saying by the TASR newswire.

The epidemiological situation in Slovakia regarding the occurrence of influenza is rather favourable to date, in line with the usual situation during the flu season, the chief public health officer Ivan Rovný was reported as saying by the TASR newswire.

Slovak public health officers are now monitoring the situation and they are expecting an increase in flu infections in early December – in the case of both the seasonal as well as the pandemic flu.

“Since there are no borders for the flu virus, it can spread freely and so we can’t prevent free movement of people,” the head of the Epidemiology Department of the Public Health Office Jan Mikas said, as quoted by TASR.

The flu has been causing problems lately mainly in Ukraine, where over 255,000 cases have been confirmed to date. TASR

Compiled by Michaela Stanková from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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