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INEKO NGO evaluates current government’s elections promises

The Slovak government that took power in July 2006 and ends its term in less than a year fully or partially met one-third of its promises according to the non-governmental Institute for Economic and Social Studies (INEKO) think tank which assessed the fulfilment of ninety of the most important pre- and post-election promises government officials made, the SITA newswire wrote.

The Slovak government that took power in July 2006 and ends its term in less than a year fully or partially met one-third of its promises according to the non-governmental Institute for Economic and Social Studies (INEKO) think tank which assessed the fulfilment of ninety of the most important pre- and post-election promises government officials made, the SITA newswire wrote.

INEKO said that of the 90 pledges it reviewed, the government did not begin to fulfil 27 of them and that another 33 were fulfilled by less than 50 percent.

“It means good and bad news at the same time for Slovakia,” said INEKO. It considers the result of its survey good because the government failed to fulfil most promises that its experts considered harmful. The institute, however, said that bad news prevail over good ones: the government met several very popular promises with negative impact on citizens while it mostly ignored a majority of positive assessed pledges.

External experts for INEKO evaluate positively that the government did not impose a higher corporate income tax rate on banks and monopolies, did not reimburse cheated clients of non-bank deposit companies and neither pushed through centralisation and nationalisation of the health insurance system. The government failed to meet its promise to scrap “bad reforms” of the previous centre-right government.

“To experts' satisfaction, Slovakia still has a flat tax and its second pension pillar did not shrink,” said INEKO to SITA. INEKO adds that the pledge of a “comprehensive settlement of the Roma question” has not been met.

The strength of the state measured by the share of government spending on GDP dropped to the lowest level in the EU in 2007-2008, said INEKO. However, over the past two years, a decrease in poverty rate was stopped in Slovakia. Within fulfilled promises, experts praised the successful euro switchover, real wage growth, a drop in unemployment, and an increase in employment of discriminated groups by the end of 2008. However, this year these indices worsened. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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