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Over half of households have internet

IN SLOVAKIA 64 percent of households have a personal computer, 62.2 percent have access to the internet and nearly 42 percent of households use broadband internet access. These are the findings of a Slovak Statistics Office survey published in mid October.

IN SLOVAKIA 64 percent of households have a personal computer, 62.2 percent have access to the internet and nearly 42 percent of households use broadband internet access. These are the findings of a Slovak Statistics Office survey published in mid October.

The office conducted the survey on usage of information and communication technologies in households and by individuals during the second quarter of 2009.

“Families with children up to 16 years old report a higher share of informatisation, as much as 80.09 percent,” said the office’s Peter Rozboril. “From the regional point of view, households in Bratislava Region and western Slovakia in general are the best equipped with internet access, with an approximate share of 67 percent. Central Slovakia reports 59.4 percent while in eastern Slovakia 56.7 percent of households have internet access.”

Broadband access is most popular in western Slovakia, with a share of 44.1 percent. In other regions this share is about 40 percent.

During the last 12 months, 28 percent of the population between 16 and 74 years of age shopped online while the most oft-purchased goods were clothes, sportswear and sporting goods (13 percent), households goods (7.9 percent), and books, newspapers, magazines and other educational material (7.1 percent).

“The value of a single order ranged between €100 and €499,” said Rozboril.

The office conducted the survey on a sample of 4,500 households and 4,172 individuals aged between 16 and 74.


Topic: IT


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