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Slovak ambassador to EU: Lisbon Treaty makes EU members work on common objectives

With the Lisbon Treaty coming into force on December 1, the European Union is gaining the opportunity to devote itself to issues through which it can explain the importance of the EU to its citizens, said Slovak ambassador to the EU Ivan Korčok on December 1.

With the Lisbon Treaty coming into force on December 1, the European Union is gaining the opportunity to devote itself to issues through which it can explain the importance of the EU to its citizens, said Slovak ambassador to the EU Ivan Korčok on December 1.

Eight years of attempts to reform the EU have cost a great deal of political energy; now, when the Lisbon Treaty is in effect, a period has begun in which the EU can use its energy on other efforts, Korčok said.

"Of course, people expect much more tangible things from the EU, as we have seen in the case of the Schengen zone, the European Monetary Union - all this is understandable for EU citizens. But first we need calm in the institutional sphere if we want to face new challenges, and this is provided by the Lisbon Treaty," argued the Slovak diplomat, speaking about the great relief he said was felt in Brussels at the completion of the ratification process. "I personally think that that we should resist the temptation to improve things for some time, because if we raise one thing, we're opening up the whole treaty," the ambassador said. According to Korčok, the Lisbon Treaty requires only a minimum transfer of powers to the EU in the case of new member states, including Slovakia.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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