Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

NEWS IN SHORT

Construction Ministry sites are priciest

THE CONSTRUCTION Ministry has come out ‘top’ in a chart of the most expensive websites for operational programmes co-financed from EU structural funds, according to a study published by the Conservative Institute, an NGO, on November 30.

THE CONSTRUCTION Ministry has come out ‘top’ in a chart of the most expensive websites for operational programmes co-financed from EU structural funds, according to a study published by the Conservative Institute, an NGO, on November 30.

The difference between the priciest and the cheapest website was €73,058. The most expensive website was that of the regional operational programme www.ropka.sk, procured by the Construction Ministry at a cost of €76,297 excluding VAT. Conservative Institute analyst Ivan Kuhn pointed out that these were funds paid out as a result of the controversial bulletin-board tender, the SITA newswire reported.

Moreover, Kuhn said it could not be ruled out that the Construction Ministry had also paid another company six months ago for creation of the same website.

The second most expensive website, www.nsrr.sk, was also procured by the Construction Ministry, at a cost of €74,651. According to the Conservative Institute’s information, the Construction Ministry paid two companies for the creation of this website in just one year.

On the other hand, the Health Ministry handled its funds most effectively, paying just €4,813 for two websites.

Construction Minister Igor Štefanov gave a press briefing at which he tried to defend the websites. Following his presentation of the reasons why his ministry had paid over €150,000 for four websites, he hurriedly left the news conference, preventing journalists from asking further questions.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.