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Slovakia to stop giving arms to Afghanistan

The Slovak Government agreed on Wednesday, December 16, to abrogate a 2006 accord to donate military equipment to Afghanistan after the latter repeatedly refused to accept weapons and ammunition between 2006 and 2008, citing a lack of storage capacity.

The Slovak Government agreed on Wednesday, December 16, to abrogate a 2006 accord to donate military equipment to Afghanistan after the latter repeatedly refused to accept weapons and ammunition between 2006 and 2008, citing a lack of storage capacity.

According to the Defence Ministry's approved proposal, the accord will expire after a notice period of 12 months.

Under the agreement, modified at a meeting of NATO defence ministers in Seville (Spain) in 2007, between the-then Slovak defence minister, František Kašický, and his Afghan counterpart Abdul Rahim Wardak, Slovakia was expected to provide 20,000 sub-machine guns, 2,000 machine guns, 14,600 assorted rounds and 14,000 howitzer rounds and other accessories.

Slovakia attempted to nullify the agreement in March of this year, but backtracked following protests from Afghanistan, the TASR newswire wrote.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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