Slovak opposition to try to oust interior minister

Slovakia’s opposition parties say they will propose a no-confidence vote in Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák in parliament next week, after having collected the required number of deputies' signatures and prepared a report listing the reasons why the minister should leave. Thirty MPs’ signatures are necessary to hold an extraordinary parliamentary session.

Slovakia’s opposition parties say they will propose a no-confidence vote in Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák in parliament next week, after having collected the required number of deputies' signatures and prepared a report listing the reasons why the minister should leave. Thirty MPs’ signatures are necessary to hold an extraordinary parliamentary session.

On January 13, representatives of the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ), the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) and the Hungarian Coalition Party (SMK) agreed to try to oust the minister. KDH leader Ján Figeľ told a press conference that everyone should do what they are best at. "Mr. Kaliňák is better at doing business than leading a ministry," Figeľ stated.

The opposition parties have criticised Kaliňák for what they say was a violation of the constitution, as well as internal and international regulations, in the case of the inadvertent transport of a package containing high explosive on a commercial flight from Poprad Airport to Ireland after a botched police security test on January 2. According to Figeľ, the incident is an unprecedented source of shame for Slovakia. He told the SITA newswire that the latest scandal is part of a series of incidents at the Interior Ministry, also listing the cases of "Rehák, Valko, Malinová, and the Franciscan friars". Meanwhile, SDKÚ leader Mikuláš Dzurinda has expressed outrage over Kaliňák's attitude towards truck drivers protesting against the new electronic road-toll system.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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