Slovak parliament rejects proposal for new method of CO2 emission trading

Slovakia’s excess emission quotas will continue to be sold in a direct sale, rather than through so-called climate exchanges or a mediator chosen by a selection procedure, as parliament rejected a proposal to amend the act on emissions trading on February 10, the TASR newswire wrote.

Slovakia’s excess emission quotas will continue to be sold in a direct sale, rather than through so-called climate exchanges or a mediator chosen by a selection procedure, as parliament rejected a proposal to amend the act on emissions trading on February 10, the TASR newswire wrote.

According to MP Tomáš Galbavý from the opposition Slovak Democratic and Christian Union party (SDKÚ) who submitted the proposal, the initiative was aimed at preventing the Environment Ministry from selling surplus emission units directly, thereby increasing the transparency of future deals.

Galbavý’s initiative came in the wake of the scandal that emerged after Slovakia sold its surplus carbon-dioxide emission quotas to the Interblue Group in 2008. The deal has come under a great deal of criticism, with the media and the opposition describing it as disadvantageous for the state.

“The company (Interblue) was chosen in a manner that provokes doubts as to whether the most advantageous offer was selected and whether Slovakia’s interests were harmed in a particularly serious way,” said Galbavý to TASR.

Speaking before parliament voted on his draft, Galbavý gave assurances that his initiative would boost the amount of funds flowing into Slovakia’s Environmental Fund, as emission credits would be sold for the maximum possible price and in a transparent way. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

More tips for outings in Bratislava during the lockdown

Walks along the Danube bank offer a feeling of being far from the city rush.

This place, part of Ovsištské Lúky (Ovsište Meadows) in Petržalka, is still Bratislava.

Roundup: Fairytale app that makes children read

An award-winning design by a Slovak architect and a trip to Zádielska dolina valley. Here’s your latest roundup.

A man wearing a face covering sits in an armchair on the snow-covered Main Street in Košice on January 13, 2021.

Police investigate surveillance of journalist, IPI calls for utmost seriousness

Police launch criminal prosecution after Denník N reporter said she was followed and opposition MP Robert Fico wrote about her private life.

l-r: Head of Let's Stop Corruption Foundation Zuzana Petková, journalist Monika Tódová, journalist Adam Valček, and Xénia Makarová of the Let's Stop Corruption Foundation