HISTORY TALKS...

Kremnica's Castle Church

THIS postcard – dating back to the times of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy – shows what is likely to be the most important site in the long history of Kremnica. The Castle Church of St. Catherine has been this rich mining town’s most dominant building since its very beginnings. First, it was a royal fortress used to protect the revenues flowing from the precious ores mined there and then to safeguard money produced from the town’s mint. As well, the monarchy’s Chamber Earl and the representative of the Royal Office resided in the building.

THIS postcard – dating back to the times of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy – shows what is likely to be the most important site in the long history of Kremnica. The Castle Church of St. Catherine has been this rich mining town’s most dominant building since its very beginnings. First, it was a royal fortress used to protect the revenues flowing from the precious ores mined there and then to safeguard money produced from the town’s mint. As well, the monarchy’s Chamber Earl and the representative of the Royal Office resided in the building.

In the Middle Ages, so-called royal houses were built in almost every free royal town. Usually, the royal scales were placed there. Often, people had to change to new means of payment when certain currencies were removed from circulation or older domestic coins were withdrawn. This also happened when coins became scuffed over time or people had reduced their size, causing them to lose weight.

The oldest part of the castle complex dates back to the 13th century. All buildings located within the complex, including the fortification itself, underwent many changes over the centuries and now we can hardly imagine what it looked like eight centuries ago. Today, St. Catherine’s church has outstanding acoustics for organ concerts and each summer the site draws thousands of visitors to its festival of organ music.


Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

News digest: The Gale targets corruption, cabinet officially prolongs curfew

Slovakia learned about biggest corporate taxpayers, the president signed laws changing the minimum wage and 13th pensions. Read the latest news overview.

Mobile testing units were built in the Hviezdoslavovo Square in Bratislava.

The big testing: When and where to show up, and what if I don't want to? (FAQ)

Here is what we know about the practicalities of the nationwide testing so far. Testing also applies to foreigners and diplomats in Slovakia.

Pilot testing in Bardejov

Storm transforms into Gale. More judges and an influential businessman detained

The police raid related to corruption in Bratislava courts.

Businessman Zoroslav Kollár (l) was brought to NAKA.