Archbishop’s grave discovered

THE MORTAL remains of Peter Pázmány, a Roman Catholic Cardinal, the Archbishop of Esztergom, and a Jesuit priest will be ceremoniously re-interred in Bratislava’s St. Martin’s Cathedral and the site of his grave will be clearly marked, said Jozef Haľko, spokesman for the Bratislava Archdiocese, who also noted for the TASR newswire that Pázmány had asked in his last testament to be buried in this cathedral. However, the exact location of his grave site was unknown until just recently.

The remains were re-interred in St. Martin's Cathedral.The remains were re-interred in St. Martin's Cathedral. (Source: SITA)

THE MORTAL remains of Peter Pázmány, a Roman Catholic Cardinal, the Archbishop of Esztergom, and a Jesuit priest will be ceremoniously re-interred in Bratislava’s St. Martin’s Cathedral and the site of his grave will be clearly marked, said Jozef Haľko, spokesman for the Bratislava Archdiocese, who also noted for the TASR newswire that Pázmány had asked in his last testament to be buried in this cathedral. However, the exact location of his grave site was unknown until just recently.

“Only a few weeks ago we managed to find his grave and to definitely identify the remains as Peter Pázmány who lived from 1570 to 1637,” the spokesman said, adding that the church also now knows that Archbishop Juraj Lippay is buried next to Pázmány.

In the middle of the 16th century the seat of the Archbishop of Esztergom, who had responsibility for the whole central European region, was moved to Trnava because of threats of attack from the Ottomans. But Archbishop Pázmány continued to resided in Prešporok, as Bratislava was then known. He was prominent in restoring Catholicism to the Hungarian Empire even though he had been born into a noble Protestant family.


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