Slovak PM suggests 'more progressive' income tax

Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico said on Tuesday, March 23, that he is convinced that the concept of higher progressiveness in personal income tax is still alive. Speaking following a meeting with representatives of the American Chamber of Commerce in the Slovak Republic, he said he did not rule out reopening the topic in future months.

Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico said on Tuesday, March 23, that he is convinced that the concept of higher progressiveness in personal income tax is still alive. Speaking following a meeting with representatives of the American Chamber of Commerce in the Slovak Republic, he said he did not rule out reopening the topic in future months.

Fico qualified his comments by saying taxpayers, including entrepreneurs, do not need to worry because the cabinet and his governing Smer party do not plan to raise tax rates for them. "No one wants to play with taxes. The tax system will, in my opinion, remain untouched regarding the income tax of legal entities. There is no intention to impose any new kinds of taxes either," he stressed for the SITA newswire.

Higher tax rates for private persons who earn high incomes were among the objectives of the government's programme statement from August 2006. A year later, the government introduced the so-called millionaire tax, by progressively reducing the non-taxable part of the tax base.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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