Supreme Court chief Harabin limits judges’ internet access

After blocking previously approved bonuses for some judges, making changes to their working schedules and agenda, swapping judges between court senates, and even initiating criminal proceedings against some Supreme Court justices, Supreme Court president Štefan Harabin is now coming under fire for allegedly interfering in judges’ use of their workplace computers.

After blocking previously approved bonuses for some judges, making changes to their working schedules and agenda, swapping judges between court senates, and even initiating criminal proceedings against some Supreme Court justices, Supreme Court president Štefan Harabin is now coming under fire for allegedly interfering in judges’ use of their workplace computers.

Several are concerned that their PCs and e-mails have been monitored, the Sme daily reported on March 25.

Silvia Machalová of Harabin's office stated that the e-mails of judges and administrative workers are never controlled. On the contrary, she said, every measure had been taken to improve the security and confidentiality of electronic correspondence.

However, suspicions arose after data disappeared from the computer of one judge, Sme reported. Moreover, as of Tuesday, March 23, judges found that they were no longer able to access some internet pages from their computers at court. The court’s management confirmed that they had limited access to certain websites which they said have nothing to do with judicial work, citing sport and pornography websites as examples.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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