Slovakia cuts development aid by 60 percent

SLOVAKIA plans to spend 60 percent less on aid to developing countries in 2010 than it did in 2009. It will carry out fewer projects within the Slovak Aid programme but, according to the National Plan of Official Development Aid presented for interdepartmental review during April, the projects will be more extensive and complex, the SITA newswire reported.

SLOVAKIA plans to spend 60 percent less on aid to developing countries in 2010 than it did in 2009. It will carry out fewer projects within the Slovak Aid programme but, according to the National Plan of Official Development Aid presented for interdepartmental review during April, the projects will be more extensive and complex, the SITA newswire reported.

The number and identity of so-called programme countries in 2010 is unchanged; they include Serbia, Kenya and Afghanistan.

In Afghanistan, Slovakia will focus on building a state governed by the rule of law, and on social development, education, health care, and the economic development of provinces. In Kenya, the focus will be on development of democracy, social development, education, health care, development of a market economy, minimisation of the effects of climate change, farming, and food safety. In Serbia, assistance will focus on the country’s European integration aspirations.

However, the number of so-called project countries will fall from sixteen to seven in 2010. In Africa, Slovak Aid will support projects in Sudan and Ethiopia; and in Europe assistance will go to Bosnia and Herzegovina, Georgia, Belarus, Moldova and Ukraine. In addition, micro-grants will be provided to Serbia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kenya, Belarus, Moldova, and Ukraine. Compiled by Spectator staff


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