A TV PROGRAMME IN ENGLISH COVERING THE MOST IMPORTANT EVENTS IN SLOVAKIA OVER THE PAST WEEK (VIDEO INCLUDED)

The week in Slovakia

Content of programme: Right and far-right win big in Hungary; Mourning Poland’s tragedy; Russian president ignores 1968; Justice system in crisis; Thousands protest opening Tatras to logging; Thieves make withdrawal; Slivovica, the wonder drug

Content of programme:


Right and far-right win big in Hungary;
Mourning Poland’s tragedy;
Russian president ignores 1968;
Justice system in crisis;
Thousands protest opening Tatras to logging;
Thieves make withdrawal;
Slivovica, the wonder drug

Brought to you in cooperation with TV SME.

After eight years, the rule of Hungary’s socialist party has been ended by the center-right Fidesz, which captured 53 percent of the popular vote over the weekend.

Slovakia declared a day of national mourning for April 17, in response to Saturday’s airplane crash in Russia that took the lives of Polish president Lech Kaczynski and dozens of Polish political, military and diplomatic leaders.

Russian President Dimitri Medvedev was in Bratislava last week signing a variety of agreements that continue Slovakia’s energy dependence on Moscow. Medvedev also commemorated soldiers who died freeing Bratislava from German occupation at the end of the Second World War. However, he made no mention of the invasion of Czechoslovakia by Warsaw Pact troops in 1968.

Slovakia’s justice system is in crisis. Foreign diplomats have begun appearing in local courtrooms to show support for judges they believe are being harassed and intimidated by Supreme Court Chief Justice Štefan Harabin.

Thousands of people have signed a protest against the Environment Ministry’s plans to reduce the protected area in the High Tatras nature reserve to make way for developers and loggers.

A gang of masked thieves parked a white Porsche Cayenne in front of a supermarket bank machine in Banská Bystrica, attached a cable to the dispenser, pulled it out of the wall then loaded the bank machine into the back of their car and took off.

Tom Nicholson has found out that slivovica, Slovakia’s fierce homemade plum brandy , is actually a wonderful medicine that can cure many ills.

On a final note, another Easter has come and gone in Slovakia. It’s not for any foreigner to tell Slovaks what to do with their traditions, or to suggest they stay home on Easter Monday instead of going to the shopping mall. But as someone who comes from a country with a real shortage of national traditions, Tom can say that Canadians can only wish they had such a choice to make.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

How a Catholic charity became a voice for migrants in Slovakia

Religious organisations have added leverage in changing perceptions of foreigners and migrants, says Caritas Slovakia.

Caritas Slovakia's ‘World Without “the Other” – Migration Myths’ campaign educates Slovaks on migration in a fun and artistic way.

Secret votes and public lies

There are uncanny echoes today of Slovakia’s agonies over its choice of chief prosecutor ten years ago.

Dobroslav Trnka (left) and Jozef Čentéš (right), the candidate who was eventually selected by MPs in 2011, never got to take up the post because the then president, Ivan Gašparovič refused to appoint him for reasons that were never clearly explained.

Which are the largest law firms in Slovakia?

For the first time, the ranking also provides an overview in partial categories of law.