Survey finds that two-thirds of Slovaks do not see Patriotism Act as useful

Two out of three Slovak citizens view the widely-discussed Patriotism Act, which was approved by parliament in March but later vetoed by President Ivan Gašparovič, as a useless piece of legislation, the TASR newswire reported.

Two out of three Slovak citizens view the widely-discussed Patriotism Act, which was approved by parliament in March but later vetoed by President Ivan Gašparovič, as a useless piece of legislation, the TASR newswire reported.

These results come from a survey carried out by the TNS SK agency in March on a sample of 830 adult respondents. A negative attitude was expressed by 63.4 percent of those asked, TASR while around one-third (36.7 percent) of the respondents said that the Patriotism Act would be useful.

People younger than age 49 were most likely to be leery of the act, along with ethnic Hungarians and people who live in smaller towns (with populations below 20,000). People living in the Žilina and Banská Bystrica regions were more supportive of such a law.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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