Transport Ministry insists PPP projects are cheaper

The Transport Ministry said on Wednesday, May 5, that another analysis it was submitting to the government showed that building motorways via private-public partnership (PPP) projects is less costly than via standard public procurement.

The Transport Ministry said on Wednesday, May 5, that another analysis it was submitting to the government showed that building motorways via private-public partnership (PPP) projects is less costly than via standard public procurement.

The cost-benefit analysis into the construction in progress was drawn up on the orders of Prime Minister Robert Fico in mid-April. The combined cost of the three highway packages combined was found to be €5.6 billion, as opposed to a potential bill of €5.793 billion for construction though normal means.

Continuing with the construction of roads via PPP projects would bring a benefit of €12 billion to Slovakia, Transport Minister Ľubomír Vážny said, as reported by the TASR newswire after a government session on Wednesday.

Vážny was referring to a PPP project analysis drawn up by the Transportation Research Institute in Žilina, although he didn't specify why the PPP projects are so favourable compared to the public procurement route. The opposition has strongly criticised the cost of the highway PPP projects.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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