Vote 2010: Polling stations closed; five municipalities close stations after 22:30

More than 5,900 polling stations closed at 22:00 across Slovakia ending the country’s one-day vote, the seventh democratic election for members of parliament since the fall of communism in 1989.

More than 5,900 polling stations closed at 22:00 across Slovakia ending the country’s one-day vote, the seventh democratic election for members of parliament since the fall of communism in 1989.

Five municipalities will remain open at least until 22:30 due to a blackout caused by a massive storm, Tatiana Janečková, chairwoman of the Central Election Commission has confirmed.

The first preliminary results of the vote will be available on the website of the Slovak Statistics Office and will be updated as vote counts from regional precincts arrive. Relevant preliminary results covering data from over 95 percent of the precincts should be known early morning on Sunday between 2:00 and 3:00.

The Slovak Spectator will be updating the election results on its webpage simultaneously with information coming from the Statistics Office.

Lívia Škultétiová of the Central Election Commission has estimated the election turnout at 65 percent in an interview with the public service Slovak Television. Four years ago, the election turnout stood at 55 percent.


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