Ordinary People say they are not taken seriously by SaS

The Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party says Ordinary People, the group of deputies who have made it to parliament on SaS ballot through preferential votes, are toying with the idea of establishing their own party. As Sme Daily reported, Igor Matovič, the leader of the Ordinary People (OL), has not excluded this possibility.

The Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party says Ordinary People, the group of deputies who have made it to parliament on SaS ballot through preferential votes, are toying with the idea of establishing their own party. As Sme Daily reported, Igor Matovič, the leader of the Ordinary People (OL), has not excluded this possibility.

Over the past couple of days, OL has been sending out signals that the party could quit the SaS deputy faction over the party’s unwillingness to include OL proposals in the government’s programme statement.

SaS leader Richard Sulík has refused to comment on the situation within the SaS; saying only that the OL representatives like seeing themselves in media, Sme wrote. On one hand, the four politicians say they want the current ruling coalition to keep its fragile majority in parliament; on the other hand they have threatened the SaS that they could quit the party’s deputy caucus, because their proposals have not been included in the programme statement.

Meanwhile, leader of the strongest opposition party, Robert Fico, has accused the coalition of not keeping their pre-election promises. He said the coalition should not talk about the fight against corruption when its members, such as Matovič, want solely to increase their “commercial” value, Sme wrote.

Ordinary People say they do not want politicians to enjoy any privileges, and they are proposing some radical solutions such as cutting the number of parliamentary deputies from 150 to 100, or banning businesses that refuse to pay wages, taxes and invoices, from running a business for 10 years. OL also proposed the examples of: decreasing the salary of parliamentary deputies who fail to attend sessions, installing random alcohol tests in parliament, decreasing the number of signatures needed to declare a referendum, abolishing bonuses for mayors, imposing tax on the salaries of politicians and publishing data on the incomes of all politicians on the internet.

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