Deputy minister: Interblue Group Europe doesn’t want to end contract

Interblue Group Europe, which clams to be the legal successor of the US-based Interblue Group that bought a large tranche of Slovakia’s carbon dioxide emission quotas during the previous government, has refused to terminate its contract to buy the emissions quotas, Agriculture and Environment Ministry State Secretary Martin Ružinský said on August 17, the TASR newswire reported.

Interblue Group Europe, which clams to be the legal successor of the US-based Interblue Group that bought a large tranche of Slovakia’s carbon dioxide emission quotas during the previous government, has refused to terminate its contract to buy the emissions quotas, Agriculture and Environment Ministry State Secretary Martin Ružinský said on August 17, the TASR newswire reported.

“In a letter sent to the ministry, the company expressed disagreement with termination of the contract concluded between Slovakia and the original Interblue,” said Ružinský. The Environment Ministry, then headed by Jozef Medveď (Smer), said it was “opting out” of the contract earlier this year. Concerns with how the contract was managed prompted former prime minister Robert Fico (Smer) to remove the ministry from the control of his then coalition partner the Slovak National Party. The Environment Ministry was subsequently cancelled and its functions given to an enlarged Agriculture Ministry.

Ružinský reported that the Agriculture and Environment Ministry is considering its response to the letter, even though Interblue Group Europe hasn’t provided sufficient evidence that it is really the legal successor of Interblue Group. Back in 2008, Slovakia sold 15 million tonnes carbon-dioxide emissions to Interblue Group at €5.05 per tonne, even though neighbouring countries had obtained significantly higher amounts for their quotas. Interblue itself later sold the quotas on to Japanese companies at €8 per tonne, according to former Interblue project manager Rastislav Bilas. The contract stipulated that Interblue would pay an additional €1 per tonne if the proceeds of the sale were spent on so-called green projects in Slovakia, money which has not so far been forthcoming. The company later said that it had transferred its rights to Interblue Group Europe, which is based in Switzerland.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

News digest: Green passes to be launched on Saturday, minister asks people not to sign up right away

Three other Delta variant cases confirmed in Slovakia. Travelling within the EU should be easier thanks to Green Passes. People in tourism optimistic about the upcoming season.


13 h
Marian Kocner and his lawyer at the Supreme Court

The wrong way to put things right

Overturning not-guilty verdicts, especially in cases as emotive as the Kuciak murder trial, is a very bad idea.


17 h
In 2020, the National Cybersecurity Centre was involved in investigating 450 ransom attacks.

North Koreans and Russians. How did hackers target Slovakia?

The security authority reported hundreds of attacks over the past year.


23. jún
Illustrative stock photo

First Delta variant case confirmed in Slovakia

The labs confirmed the strain in a positive sample from a person who returned from Russia.


23. jún