Mikloš files criminal complaint against Chief Justice Harabin for obstructing audit

Finance Minister Ivan Mikloš from the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) filed a criminal complaint against Chief Justice Štefan Harabin on August 18 for obstructing the ministry’s attempts to conduct an audit at the Supreme Court, the Finance Ministry told the TASR newswire.

Finance Minister Ivan Mikloš from the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) filed a criminal complaint against Chief Justice Štefan Harabin on August 18 for obstructing the ministry’s attempts to conduct an audit at the Supreme Court, the Finance Ministry told the TASR newswire.

The criminal complaint alleging misconduct by Harabin was submitted to the Police Corps Presidium as well as to the Prosecutor General’s Office. According to Mikuláš Gera from the ministry, the Supreme Court chairman abused his powers by not allowing the ministry to audit the Court.

“As the Supreme Court chairman is repeatedly obstructing a government audit there is a justified suspicion that he is trying to prevent the discovery of illegal management of public resources at the court,” said Gera.

Harabin has refused to allow Finance Ministry officials to audit the Court’s accounts for over two weeks, arguing in writing to the ministry that the only body with the power to audit the Supreme Court is the Supreme Audit Office (NKÚ), as the court uses funds approved by parliament.

Four attempts to carry out audits have been thwarted to date. Mikloš said that checking on public spending is within the purview of his ministry and not even the Supreme Court can choose which institution will carry out audits. The Finance Ministry conducted similar audits at the Supreme Court in 2007 and 2009.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

News digest: The Gale targets corruption, cabinet officially prolongs curfew

Slovakia learned about biggest corporate taxpayers, the president signed laws changing the minimum wage and 13th pensions. Read the latest news overview.

Mobile testing units were built in the Hviezdoslavovo Square in Bratislava.

The big testing: When and where to show up, and what if I don't want to? (FAQ)

Here is what we know about the practicalities of the nationwide testing so far. Testing also applies to foreigners and diplomats in Slovakia.

Pilot testing in Bardejov

Storm transforms into Gale. More judges and an influential businessman detained

The police raid related to corruption in Bratislava courts.

Businessman Zoroslav Kollár (l) was brought to NAKA.