Constitution Day celebrated in Slovakia on September 1

Slovakia celebrated its Constitution Day as a national holiday on Wednesday, September 1, with citizens commemorating the eighteenth anniversary of adoption of their Constitution by the Slovak Parliament, the SITA newswire wrote.

Slovakia celebrated its Constitution Day as a national holiday on Wednesday, September 1, with citizens commemorating the eighteenth anniversary of adoption of their Constitution by the Slovak Parliament, the SITA newswire wrote.

The constitution was adopted on September 1, 1992, and this de facto meant the establishment of the Slovak Republic as a sovereign and democratic country.

The joint state of Czechs and Slovaks ceased to exist at midnight on December 31, 1992 and two sovereign countries began: the Slovak Republic and the Czech Republic. The Constitution was approved by the Slovak Parliament at the fifth session of its election term, SITA noted.

Out of 134 MPs present in the 150-member parliament, 114 voted in favour of the draft, 16 were against and four abstained from the vote. The Constitution became effective on the date of promulgation, on October 1, 1992.

Slovakia’s Constitution is composed of a preamble and nine chapters. It sets out fundamental rights and freedoms, political rights, rights of ethnic minorities, social, cultural, and economic rights as well as the right to court and legal protection. The constitution also establishes the separation of powers as one of the fundamental principles of the rule of law. Most of the provisions of the Constitution came into effect on January 1, 1993, the day an independent Slovak Republic was established.

This year’s celebrations of Constitution Day were dampened by the tragedy that happened in Bratislava’s residential district of Devinska Nova Ves on August 30 when a gunman shot and killed seven people before being killed.

The government declared a day of national mourning on September 2. The government also cancelled a planned Open Day at the Cabinet Office on September 1 and instead prepared a condolence book that is available to citizens.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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