Motion to remove Speaker of Parliament Sulík fails

Richard Sulík, the Speaker of the Slovak Parliament, survived a no-confidence vote on Wednesday, September 8 with only 64 MPs voting in a secret ballot to remove Sulík, the TASR newswire reported.

Richard Sulík, the Speaker of the Slovak Parliament, survived a no-confidence vote on Wednesday, September 8 with only 64 MPs voting in a secret ballot to remove Sulík, the TASR newswire reported.

At least 76 MPs, a simple majority of 150 MPs, is required for a no-confidence motion to succeed. The bid to remove Sulík was initiated by opposition Smer lawmakers and Sulík is the first official to have faced a non-confidence vote in the current election period.

Earlier in the day, members of the parliamentary mandate and immunity committee approved moving the proposal to parliament but it passed mainly due to the absence of several MPs from the governing coalition, with Smer and Slovak National Party (SNS) MPs voting in favour.

The opposition presented the motion because of Sulík's statement that SaS placed its nominees only on the local commissions for the upcoming national referendum saying this is “the place to influence vote-counts”. Sulík later corrected his words, as quoted by the TASR newswire, by saying that he meant “transparency oversight” rather than “influence”.

Smer also criticised what it called protocol-related faux pas on the part of Sulík as well as a statement Sulík directed at other EU member states for their ready willingness to assist the financially-troubled Greek government.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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