BUSINESS IN SHORT

Bratislava bested by nearby capitals

BRATISLAVA is a less attractive place to do business than any of its regional peers, according to a survey by Cushman & Wakefield, a consulting company. It ranked the Slovak capital 32nd among 36 cities assessed in 2010, the SITA newswire reported.

BRATISLAVA is a less attractive place to do business than any of its regional peers, according to a survey by Cushman & Wakefield, a consulting company. It ranked the Slovak capital 32nd among 36 cities assessed in 2010, the SITA newswire reported.

Even though it was the first time that Bratislava had appeared on the list, it was surpassed by the capitals of all of Slovakia’s central European neighbours. However, the managers of firms taking part in the survey did positively assess Bratislava for its low labour costs, government support for business and low operating costs for office space.

The decisive criteria which managers used to choose the location for company offices were: access to markets and customers, a quality workforce, quality telecommunications, and good local and international transport connections, SITA wrote.

The top trio of cities best suited for doing business did not change in this year’s survey: business managers gave the highest marks to London, Paris and Frankfurt for the second year in a row. Prague maintained its 21st position while Warsaw fell one spot to 24th place and Budapest slipped from 26th to 30th. Vienna jumped from 28th place last year to 22nd this year.


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