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Patriotism Act might be amended

A GROUP of coalition MPs led by Ondrej Dostál of the Most-Híd caucus has submitted a proposal to change the law on state symbols adopted by the previous government so as not to require that state symbols be displayed in every school classroom, the SITA newswire reported.

A GROUP of coalition MPs led by Ondrej Dostál of the Most-Híd caucus has submitted a proposal to change the law on state symbols adopted by the previous government so as not to require that state symbols be displayed in every school classroom, the SITA newswire reported.

The MPs also want to erase from the law a provision on compulsory education in patriotism as part of public educational programmes. They argue that the duty for schools to install the national flag, the text of the national anthem and the preamble to the constitution in every classroom represents a specious use of state symbols rather than an act to teach patriotism.

Dostál proposes having national flags and texts of the anthem and the preamble in each school but not in every classroom.

“It was one of the things that the opposition quite sharply criticised in the past election term, [and] when it had been adopted it was clear to everyone that it was mere electioneering by the Slovak National Party (SNS) and Smer, [but] now nobody is rushing to change this law,” Dostál said, as quoted by SITA.

The law on state symbols, which took effect as of September 2010, establishes a duty to respect Slovak state symbols.

It stipulates that the national anthem must be played at the beginning and at the end of the school year. The anthem is also

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