Parliament approves unfreezing of MPs' salaries

MPs' salaries should be reduced by a percentage equal to two times the public finance deficit – but before this, their salaries must be unfrozen, according to a bill approved by parliament at its first reading on Thursday, November 4.

MPs' salaries should be reduced by a percentage equal to two times the public finance deficit – but before this, their salaries must be unfrozen, according to a bill approved by parliament at its first reading on Thursday, November 4.

The bill, submitted by Speaker Richard Sulík (Freedom and Solidarity (SaS)), includes a proposal to reduce MPs' lump-sum allowances by 10 percent, and a merger of the cost of an MP's assistant and office into a single expenditure item, which would then be reduced to 90 percent of an MP's gross salary.

Sulík told the TASR newswire that the measures would reduce expenditure on MPs by 10.13 percent in 2011, representing a saving of €1.3 million per year. The proposal would also reduce the severance pay for MPs from five times their monthly salary to three times. Opposition leader Robert Fico (Smer), under whose leadership the freeze was introduced, opposes the coalition's plan to restore the valorisation of MPs' salaries.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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