Slovaks prepared for improved access to information, Wienk tells IT congress

Slovak society is ready for a change in attitudes towards access to information, Zuzana Wienk of the political fairness watchdog Fair-Play Alliance said, as quoted by the SITA newswire. Wienk, the alliance’s executive director, announced at the ITAPA 2010 International Congress, a meeting of IT and knowledge-economy representatives held in Bratislava on November 9-10, that information is now available on the internet the moment it emerges, and Slovakia must adapt itself to this trend.

Slovak society is ready for a change in attitudes towards access to information, Zuzana Wienk of the political fairness watchdog Fair-Play Alliance said, as quoted by the SITA newswire. Wienk, the alliance’s executive director, announced at the ITAPA 2010 International Congress, a meeting of IT and knowledge-economy representatives held in Bratislava on November 9-10, that information is now available on the internet the moment it emerges, and Slovakia must adapt itself to this trend.

The country already has standard laws, and the applicable technology is also available, but the lack of a professional approach by the public administration, and the attitude of the public, is still hampering development in the sphere.

People were taken aback by the change in 1989 and people are adapting to the principles of free access to information only slowly, she added. Wienk drew attention to a positive trend in which civil initiatives no longer belong exclusively to organisations, and more and more individuals are joining such efforts. The penetration of online social networks is also helping to spread information, she said.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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