Parliament okays 80-percent tax on surplus emission quotas

Surplus emissions quotas that some companies received under the previous government will be subject to a newly-introduced 80-percent tax in 2011 and 2012, after parliament voted in favour of a proposal to this effect on Wednesday, December 1.

Surplus emissions quotas that some companies received under the previous government will be subject to a newly-introduced 80-percent tax in 2011 and 2012, after parliament voted in favour of a proposal to this effect on Wednesday, December 1.

The move was backed by the entire ruling coalition, while most MPs representing the opposition parties abstained from the vote, the TASR newswire wrote. Speaking last week, Finance Minister Ivan Mikloš (Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ)) defended the initiative by saying that Slovak companies were set overly generous emissions limits by the previous government, earning them €660 million over the 2008-12 period. He said these limits were disadvantageous for the state, so the ministry has decided to levy a tax on the surplus amounts. The measure is intended to raise €150 million. Smer leader and former prime minister Robert Fico dismissed Mikloš’ allegations about the former government handing out overly generous emission limits as “rubbish”.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

Igor Matovič (left) and Richard Sulík (right) in May 2020.

The far-right is falling, SaS stays ahead of OĽaNO

Za Ľudí would return to the parliament, according to the latest poll.

4 h
Illustrative stock photo

Gov't approved stricter Covid measures. If ineffective, hard lockdown will follow

FFP2 respirators will be obligatory, some schools will close again.

18 h
The AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine was approved for use in the EU on January 29, 2021.

We need to talk about AstraZeneca. Without curse words

If you can’t deliver — fine. Then don’t say you can.

22 h