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President Gašparovič objects to doubts being raised about the euro

Slovak President Ivan Gašparovič – in his New Year's speech on Saturday, January 1 – expressed his disagreement with doubts being cast about the euro, the common EU currency, the TASR newswire reported. "This isn't a good approach. Even though I can't evaluate exactly what difficulties we would have been in today without the euro, maybe we would have got lost like lonely runners on the difficult journey through the economic crisis with our own currency," Gašparovič said in his speech, adding that it is better to face the problems together.

Slovak President Ivan Gašparovič – in his New Year's speech on Saturday, January 1 – expressed his disagreement with doubts being cast about the euro, the common EU currency, the TASR newswire reported.

"This isn't a good approach. Even though I can't evaluate exactly what difficulties we would have been in today without the euro, maybe we would have got lost like lonely runners on the difficult journey through the economic crisis with our own currency," Gašparovič said in his speech, adding that it is better to face the problems together.

The president also recalled that it was not easy for Slovakia to become a member of the eurozone. "Let's not forget the fact that we've gained a lot of jobs and production capacities that generate quite a stable gross domestic product especially thanks to the euro," Gasparovic said. "This is why we have to ensure that the euro will be sustained," he stated, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

According to Gašparovič, Slovaks would welcome "more explanations [from politicians] instead of skirmishes in parliament, so that they could understand the current situation more clearly and also understand the possible ways out of it”.

Regardless of the political affiliation of individual politicians or anyone else concerned, improvement of the situation in the Slovak judiciary should become a major goal for 2011 the Slovak President said. He also added that foreign investments are very important for Slovakia.

"We're happy about every single investment," he stated, but at the same time asked whether this is the only possible way to ensure jobs for Slovak people and whether Slovakia relies on foreign countries too much.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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