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Future meetings of Slovakia’s Judicial Council to be public

The public will be allowed to be present at meetings of the Judicial Council, the highest self-governing body of the judiciary in Slovakia, the SITA newswire reported.

The public will be allowed to be present at meetings of the Judicial Council, the highest self-governing body of the judiciary in Slovakia, the SITA newswire reported.

The right of the public to attend Judicial Council meetings was part of an amendment to the applicable law that became effective on January 1 after parliament overturned a presidential veto.

"People will also be able to listen to recordings from meetings of the Judicial Council. They will be able to watch and listen, almost live, how the new judges are selected," Justice Minister Lucia Žitňanská told the SITA newswire. Detailed minutes will also be published on the internet.

Žitňanská said in addition to public participation, the agenda of the meetings and the contents of resolutions adopted as well as the course of the meetings, statements of individual members and the result of voting should be clear from the audio recording and the minutes.

The justice minister added that the council will also have to justify its decisions, particularly concerning its personnel policies.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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