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Judges’ demands in suits alleging salary discrimination reach a total of €70 million

The judges who are suing Slovakia for alleged salary discrimination are demandingtotal compensation of over €70 million from the state – an amount which is almost €9 million more than the first estimate, the SITA newswire reported.

The judges who are suing Slovakia for alleged salary discrimination are demanding
total compensation of over €70 million from the state – an amount which is almost €9 million more than the first estimate, the SITA newswire reported.

The Justice Ministry, which is in the process of summarising the discrimination lawsuits filed over the past four years, discovered that after having assembled data from parliament and three courts the original €61 million swelled to more than €70 million. The ministry said that 702 judges from across Slovakia rather than the original list of 554 judges had filed lawsuits, according to the spokesman for the Ministry of Justice, Peter Bubla.

The judges are suing the state for alleged salary discrimination, claiming they received lower salaries than their colleagues at the Special Court, established to deal with cases of high profile corruption and organised crime. The current leadership of the Ministry of Justice, which represents the Slovak Republic in legal disputes, has adopted the position that it considers the lawsuits ungrounded and is calling on courts to dismiss them.

The ministry has noted that the judges that filed these lawsuits are biased and should be excluded from deciding on these cases. The ministry also has filed a complaint at the Constitutional Court regarding the lawsuits.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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