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SSN and IPI Slovensko concerned about new Hungarian press code

The Slovak Syndicate of Journalists (SSN) on Thursday, January 13, expressed concern about Hungary's new press code, the TASR newswire wrote.

The Slovak Syndicate of Journalists (SSN) on Thursday, January 13, expressed concern about Hungary's new press code, the TASR newswire wrote.

In particular, the SSN criticised the sanctions created to penalise what the press code vaguely refers to as "unbalanced reporting". The SSN views this as unacceptable interference by the executive in the work of the media. In addition, some wording in the law makes it sound as if the main objective is to insist on ethnic rather than ethical principles in journalism, which is dangerous, said the SSN. The syndicate also expressed its solidarity and support for Hungarian journalists.

The Slovak branch of the International Press Institute, IPI Slovensko, also supports the Hungarian media in its efforts to preserve press freedom, the institute's supervisory board chairman Pavol Múdry announced in a press release.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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