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Claims fly over botched police sting

TWO weeks after a Czech truck driver with a full load of a chemical substance that can be used to produce heroin was detained in Turkey after a bungled international sting operation initiated by the Slovak police, the Turkish government has issued its first statement – saying Slovak police had made mistakes during the operation.

TWO weeks after a Czech truck driver with a full load of a chemical substance that can be used to produce heroin was detained in Turkey after a bungled international sting operation initiated by the Slovak police, the Turkish government has issued its first statement – saying Slovak police had made mistakes during the operation.

“Unfortunately, several mistakes and deficiencies occurred in the conduct of the Slovak security forces,” the Turkish embassy wrote in a statement reported by Markíza TV.

The embassy statement also noted that the Turkish government was concerned about some of the public statements Slovak authorities have made concerning the incident.

The Slovak Interior Ministry is maintaining its position that the police action failed because the Turkish police stopped communicating with Slovak authorities and stated there are no specific complaints in the embassy’s statement.

Interior Ministry spokesperson Gábor Grendel told the Sme daily that the ministry will continue a dialogue with the Turkish authorities, but at the moment considers the actions taken by Turkish police during the sting operation as inexplicable.


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