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Slovakia’s Judicial Council holds its first-ever public session

Slovakia’s Judicial Council held its first-ever public session on January 17, council spokesman Michal Jurči told the TASR newswire. "I have no problem with that. On the contrary, I'm glad. As a judge, it always gives me joy to have, for instance, law students come and see the court sessions," said Judicial Council Chairman Štefan Harabin, who is also Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

Slovakia’s Judicial Council held its first-ever public session on January 17, council spokesman Michal Jurči told the TASR newswire.

"I have no problem with that. On the contrary, I'm glad. As a judge, it always gives me joy to have, for instance, law students come and see the court sessions," said Judicial Council Chairman Štefan Harabin, who is also Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

According to Harabin, the Judicial Council plans to convene its sessions in different regions of Slovakia so that people will have an opportunity to become familiar with its work.

"People will get to see for themselves that we don't hold anything back and we do our jobs dutifully," he said. Harabin hopes that Justice Minister Lucia Žitňanská will propose, in her fight for transparency, to make the meetings of the Slovak cabinet public as well.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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