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Sociálna Poisťovnňa to lay off 600 staff within six months

The state-owned social insurance company, Sociálna Poisťovňa (SP), is planning to lay off 600 of its current 5,900 employees within six months of February 1, SP’s general director, Ľuboš Lopatka, told the TASR newswire on January 17. Lopatka said that SP is not doing this primarily to cut its expenditures.

The state-owned social insurance company, Sociálna Poisťovňa (SP), is planning to lay off 600 of its current 5,900 employees within six months of February 1, SP’s general director, Ľuboš Lopatka, told the TASR newswire on January 17.

Lopatka said that SP is not doing this primarily to cut its expenditures.

"We're not reducing the number of people because it's in the budget, because somebody ordered us to do so, or due to the crisis. This is right and it is necessary to do this so that the institution functions properly," Lopatka said.

SP should save around €8 million overall with initial savings of €2 million. Lopatka said the aim of the move is to improve SP's reputation and pro-client focus by increasing the quality of the remaining employees who he said should be more motivated in the future due to the introduction of flexible bonuses based on work results and supplementary training.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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