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Expert in Malinová case excluded from list of experts

The dean of the Medical School of Bratislava’s Comenius University, Peter Labaš, who was supposed to provide expert opinion on the widely reported case of Hedviga Malinová, has been excluded from a list of court experts published on the internet.

The dean of the Medical School of Bratislava’s Comenius University, Peter Labaš, who was supposed to provide expert opinion on the widely reported case of Hedviga Malinová, has been excluded from a list of court experts published on the internet.

According to the internet-published data, Labaš does not have the type of insurance stipulated by the law and required for all those who want to serve as court experts. Labaš told the TASR newswire on Tuesday, January 25, that this is nonsense and that he’s still providing expert opinions on a daily basis. “I’ll have to have a look at that. I must have forgotten to bring [the insurance certificate] to them,” he said.

Hedviga Malinová alleged in August 2006 that she had been beaten up by two unknown men in Nitra for speaking Hungarian on her mobile phone. The investigation into the attack was dropped shortly afterwards, with then-interior minister Robert Kaliňák (Smer) claiming that no attack had in fact taken place and that Malinová had made the whole story up. Malinová was then accused of providing a false statement. The case has remained in limbo for several years now; the General Prosecutor’s Office says it is still waiting for Labaš’ expert opinion.

Source: TASR
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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