Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Police investigate PKO demolition

Police have launched an investigation into the planned demolition of Bratislava's well-known PKO Culture and Leisure Centre, Police Corps Presidium spokesperson Andrea Dobiašová said on Thursday, January 27, as reported by the TASR newswire.

Police have launched an investigation into the planned demolition of Bratislava's well-known PKO Culture and Leisure Centre, Police Corps Presidium spokesperson Andrea Dobiašová said on Thursday, January 27, as reported by the TASR newswire.

The Office for the Fight Against Corruption is looking into whether there was an abuse of power in the management of public property. "With the investigation being in its initial stages, no more information can be provided," she said. The PKO issue gained particular prominence after MP and former Bratislava mayor Andrej Ďurkovský announced on Tuesday that he was leaving the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) in an attempt to lessen the negative impact on the party caused by scandals which had been linked to him. These concern PKO's demolition, and alleged financial impropriety at the city-controlled Bratislava Water Company (BVS).

The Sme daily reported on January 19 that then-mayor Ďurkovský signed a document three days prior to the municipal elections last November whereby a company called Henbury Development was granted full powers to tear down PKO. In the document, dated November 24, Bratislava City Hall surrendered its rights over the issue. It is suspected that Ďurkovský acted on his own, i.e. without having sought the approval of Bratislava city councillors, the daily wrote. In line with the latest agreement between Henbury Development and Bratislava City Hall, no demolition will be carried out until the end of February 2011.

According to a legal analysis as requested by civil activists, PKO's demolition requires the consent of local councillors. Bratislava Council has never agreed to such a move, however. Civil activists claim that Ďurkovský wasn't entitled to sign an agreement on cooperation with Henbury, or provide his consent for PKO's demolition.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).