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First parliamentary session of 2011 will test coalition's cohesion

The first parliamentary session of 2011 that begins on the afternoon of February 1 will test the governing coalition's cohesion, the SITA newswire wrote. Early in the agenda, the MPs will decide on several bills vetoed by the president: the law on judges, the revision to the State Language Act, the law on funding of elementary schools, high schools and educational facilities, and the revision to the law on health insurance companies.

The first parliamentary session of 2011 that begins on the afternoon of February 1 will test the governing coalition's cohesion, the SITA newswire wrote. Early in the agenda, the MPs will decide on several bills vetoed by the president: the law on judges, the revision to the State Language Act, the law on funding of elementary schools, high schools and educational facilities, and the revision to the law on health insurance companies.

The agenda of the February session also features several politically sensitive issues: an amendment to Slovakia’s citizenship law, which the previous government adopted in reaction to Hungary’s dual citizenship legislation; recorded balloting to select the next general prosecutor; and voting to pick the new director general of Slovakia’s public-broadcasting, RTVS.

Parliament may also convene for two unscheduled sessions as the opposition Smer party is seeking a no-confidence vote in Health Minister Ivan Uhliarik and the opposition wants to hold another round of secret balloting for the new general prosecutor.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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