Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Trnka departs, GP job now vacant

THE TERM of Slovakia’s general prosecutor, Dobroslav Trnka, elapsed on February 2. However, a final decision on who will fill one of the country’s most powerful positions is still not in sight, with the ruling coalition and opposition continuing to quarrel over the how the next top prosecutor should be selected. Trnka has said he might return, but the ruling coalition led by Iveta Radičová is going to considerable lengths to ensure that he does not win re-appointment.

THE TERM of Slovakia’s general prosecutor, Dobroslav Trnka, elapsed on February 2. However, a final decision on who will fill one of the country’s most powerful positions is still not in sight, with the ruling coalition and opposition continuing to quarrel over the how the next top prosecutor should be selected. Trnka has said he might return, but the ruling coalition led by Iveta Radičová is going to considerable lengths to ensure that he does not win re-appointment.

Meanwhile, the largest opposition party in parliament, Smer, tried to initiate a specially summoned session of parliament on February 2 in order to hold a vote on the job, but the ruling coalition blocked the convening of the session. In response, Smer leader Robert Fico and other party members unfurled three banners, simulating a protest rally in parliament.

While Smer wants to have the next prosecutor selected in a secret ballot and is backing Trnka, the ruling coalition parties want a public vote. To achieve a change in the way the general prosecutor is chosen, parliament must amend the law on prosecution as well as the parliamentary discussion order. This might mean that a general prosecutor will not be chosen until May.

“The prosecution does not stand or fall on Trnka,” Trnka himself said on January 29, adding that he was leaving neither in anger nor sadness. Nevertheless, on February 2 he did let off some steam in a TV interview.

THE TERM of Slovakia’s general prosecutor, Dobroslav Trnka, elapsed on February 2. However, a final decision on who will fill one of the country’s most powerful positions is still not in sight, with the ruling coalition and opposition continuing to quarrel over the how the next top prosecutor should be selected. Trnka has said he might return, but the ruling coalition led by Iveta Radičová is going to considerable lengths to ensure that he does not win re-appointment.

Meanwhile, the largest opposition party in parliament, Smer, tried to initiate a specially summoned session of parliament on February 2 in order to hold a vote on the job, but the ruling coalition blocked the convening of the session. In response, Smer leader Robert Fico and other party members unfurled three banners, simulating a protest rally in parliament.

While Smer wants to have the next prosecutor selected in a secret ballot and is backing Trnka, the ruling coalition parties want a public vote. To achieve a change in the way the general prosecutor is chosen, parliament must amend the law on prosecution as well as the parliamentary discussion order. This might mean that a general prosecutor will not be chosen until May.

“The prosecution does not stand or fall on Trnka,” Trnka himself said on January 29, adding that he was leaving neither in anger nor sadness. Nevertheless, on February 2 he did let off some steam in a TV interview.


Top stories

Blog: Why did I come here?

A group of teachers and students from the Bratislava-based school gathered to support their friend, colleague, and fellow foreigner, as she had already tried four times just to get in the door of the foreign police.

Queue in front of the foreigners' police department in Bratislava.

Sagan rewrites history Video

Cyclist Peter Sagan becomes the first man to win three consecutive world championships.

Teachers and scientist support anti-corruption march

They praise the activities of students who may change the current state of corruption.

Organisers of the first student protest, Karolína Farská and Dávid Straka.

Bojnice spa fears loss of thermal water due to coal mining

The spa has turned to the EP; the mine sees claims of the Bojnice spa as not expert-based and manipulating public opinion

People enjoying hot water in Bojnice spa.