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Trnka departs, GP job now vacant

THE TERM of Slovakia’s general prosecutor, Dobroslav Trnka, elapsed on February 2. However, a final decision on who will fill one of the country’s most powerful positions is still not in sight, with the ruling coalition and opposition continuing to quarrel over the how the next top prosecutor should be selected. Trnka has said he might return, but the ruling coalition led by Iveta Radičová is going to considerable lengths to ensure that he does not win re-appointment.

THE TERM of Slovakia’s general prosecutor, Dobroslav Trnka, elapsed on February 2. However, a final decision on who will fill one of the country’s most powerful positions is still not in sight, with the ruling coalition and opposition continuing to quarrel over the how the next top prosecutor should be selected. Trnka has said he might return, but the ruling coalition led by Iveta Radičová is going to considerable lengths to ensure that he does not win re-appointment.

Meanwhile, the largest opposition party in parliament, Smer, tried to initiate a specially summoned session of parliament on February 2 in order to hold a vote on the job, but the ruling coalition blocked the convening of the session. In response, Smer leader Robert Fico and other party members unfurled three banners, simulating a protest rally in parliament.

While Smer wants to have the next prosecutor selected in a secret ballot and is backing Trnka, the ruling coalition parties want a public vote. To achieve a change in the way the general prosecutor is chosen, parliament must amend the law on prosecution as well as the parliamentary discussion order. This might mean that a general prosecutor will not be chosen until May.

“The prosecution does not stand or fall on Trnka,” Trnka himself said on January 29, adding that he was leaving neither in anger nor sadness. Nevertheless, on February 2 he did let off some steam in a TV interview.

THE TERM of Slovakia’s general prosecutor, Dobroslav Trnka, elapsed on February 2. However, a final decision on who will fill one of the country’s most powerful positions is still not in sight, with the ruling coalition and opposition continuing to quarrel over the how the next top prosecutor should be selected. Trnka has said he might return, but the ruling coalition led by Iveta Radičová is going to considerable lengths to ensure that he does not win re-appointment.

Meanwhile, the largest opposition party in parliament, Smer, tried to initiate a specially summoned session of parliament on February 2 in order to hold a vote on the job, but the ruling coalition blocked the convening of the session. In response, Smer leader Robert Fico and other party members unfurled three banners, simulating a protest rally in parliament.

While Smer wants to have the next prosecutor selected in a secret ballot and is backing Trnka, the ruling coalition parties want a public vote. To achieve a change in the way the general prosecutor is chosen, parliament must amend the law on prosecution as well as the parliamentary discussion order. This might mean that a general prosecutor will not be chosen until May.

“The prosecution does not stand or fall on Trnka,” Trnka himself said on January 29, adding that he was leaving neither in anger nor sadness. Nevertheless, on February 2 he did let off some steam in a TV interview.


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