Coalition undecided on fate of Slovakia’s state-owned central heating firms

Privatisation of Slovakia’s central heating companies remained an open issue after a meeting of the four-party Coalition Council on February 7, with Prime Minister Iveta Radičová stating after the session that the sale of the firms will be evaluated individually but that some of them might be privatised, the SITA newswire reported. The prime minister indicated that the privatisation could be advantageous for some of the heating companies if an appropriate strategic investor can be found, adding that their economic performance under state control has been problematic, SITA wrote. Slovakia’s National Property Fund, which is the owner of the facilities, is also expected to table alternative solutions including privatisation projects in which local governments and municipalities could participate.

Privatisation of Slovakia’s central heating companies remained an open issue after a meeting of the four-party Coalition Council on February 7, with Prime Minister Iveta Radičová stating after the session that the sale of the firms will be evaluated individually but that some of them might be privatised, the SITA newswire reported.

The prime minister indicated that the privatisation could be advantageous for some of the heating companies if an appropriate strategic investor can be found, adding that their economic performance under state control has been problematic, SITA wrote. Slovakia’s National Property Fund, which is the owner of the facilities, is also expected to table alternative solutions including privatisation projects in which local governments and municipalities could participate.

The process also has to take into account the opinion of EU officials in Brussels, SITA wrote. Coalition leaders said they would like to put an end to political nomination of persons to the management boards of companies that are fully or partially controlled by the state. Radičová told SITA that her team was expected to discuss a blueprint for rules governing selection, management and remuneration of persons sitting on these boards at its regular session on February 9.

The prime minister also said that a draft revision to the law on regulation of network industries will further be modified in the parliament, saying the expected changes are meant to guarantee the maximum independence of the Regulatory Office for Network Industries so that it fulfils its duties properly. The revision of the law, as submitted to parliament, calls for changes in the organisational structure of the regulator as of April. MPs have suggested that the single chairman of regulatory agency be replaced by a three-member commission with its members appointed by the cabinet for six-year terms.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

How many people were infected in Volkswagen or U.S. Steel? Top companies mostly remain silent

Biggest employers have introduced measures, they do not want to talk about possible layoffs.

The Bratislava plant of Volkswagen maintained strict measures also in the summer.

News digest: Lockdown not out of the question, PM Matovič says

The overview of news from Wednesday, October 21, 2020.

PM Igor Matovič says lockdown is still in play.

A curfew for those who refuse testing? Lawyers and president have doubts

The government risks the Constitutional Court canceling the nationwide testing.

Illustrative stock photo

The cabinet approves plan for permanent kurzarbeit

The new fund is expected to be introduced from 2022.

Labour Minister Milan Krajniak