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Sulík: Coalition may not lose majority if Matovič forms his own party

If independent MP Igor Matovič along with his colleagues from the Ordinary People faction (OL) were to form their own political party, the coalition might not necessarily lose its majority in parliament, Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) chairman Richard Sulík said after a party meeting on Wednesday, February 16.

If independent MP Igor Matovič along with his colleagues from the Ordinary People faction (OL) were to form their own political party, the coalition might not necessarily lose its majority in parliament, Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) chairman Richard Sulík said after a party meeting on Wednesday, February 16.

According to Sulík, the situation could be addressed with an addendum to the Coalition Agreement. “When that party comes into being, in all likelihood we will try to find some way to deal with the situation at the coalition level ... I’m absolutely confident that their political party won’t go into a coalition with any of the current opposition parties. Revisiting the Coalition Agreement could fix the situation,” Sulík said, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

His remarks come in the wake of a now-averted coalition crisis that had been simmering since OL leader Igor Matovič was expelled from the SaS caucus for siding with the opposition on Thursday, February 10. OL would need at least eight MPs to enjoy party status in parliament; it currently has four.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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