Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Use of illegal software declining among firms in Slovakia

The use of illegal software in Slovakia is decreasing among companies but is on the rise in households, according to estimates by the Business Software Alliance (BSA), the SITA newswire reported, adding that the piracy rate in Slovak firms decreased by a couple of percentage points last year due to more awareness of the risks and prevention activities by BSA.

The use of illegal software in Slovakia is decreasing among companies but is on the rise in households, according to estimates by the Business Software Alliance (BSA), the SITA newswire reported, adding that the piracy rate in Slovak firms decreased by a couple of percentage points last year due to more awareness of the risks and prevention activities by BSA.

BSA estimated an increase in household piracy by an average of two to three percentage points annually. BSA spokeswoman Slávka Šikurová told SITA that the increase in the use of illegal software at home is a result of a higher number of personal computers and easy internet access where illegal software can be found.

If firms are found using illegal software, they will have to pay six percent more than in the previous years, BSA said, noting that the average amount of compensation to damaged software producers will reach €6,400. The number of firms which try to avoid criminal proceedings by paying the compensation is on the rise, too.

"Managers usually try to reach an out-of-court settlement. No one wants to risk a
criminal record," she added.

According to last year's analysis, 43 percent of the software in Slovakia was being used illegally. The Slovak software industry suffered a loss of almost €45.23 million due to piracy, said BSA.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Government ignores anticorruption demands Photo

Protesters gave the government two weeks to fulfil their demands.

Slovak AeroMobil starts taking pre-orders for its flying car Photo

The company is losing a key figure – inventor Štefan Klein.

Prince Albert II of Monaco (r) and Juraj Vaculík, CEO and co-founder of AeroMobil, unveiled the latest prototype of a flying car in Monaco on April 20.

Drivers in Bratislava should prepare for worse traffic

Dissatisfied taxi drivers will go on a protest ride from Petržalka to Lamač on Wednesday.

Taxi drivers protested against Uber already in 2015.