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Slovakia’s governing coalition fails to reach agreement on citizenship issues

A governing coalition working group failed to reach agreement on issues surrounding state citizenship, and specifically dual citizenship, Culture Minister Daniel Krajcer told the TASR newswire after the group's meeting on February 28. Because of this impasse TASR wrote that in all likelihood an amendment to the State Citizenship Act will not be submitted to parliament in March.

A governing coalition working group failed to reach agreement on issues surrounding state citizenship, and specifically dual citizenship, Culture Minister Daniel Krajcer told the TASR newswire after the group's meeting on February 28.

Because of this impasse TASR wrote that in all likelihood an amendment to the State Citizenship Act will not be submitted to parliament in March.

"No proposal will be put forward without an agreement," Krajcer said.

Independent MP Igor Matovič said he is glad to see that opinions voiced by some members of the coalition’s four parties are in accord with his own, TASR wrote. In February Matovič voted with the opposition on the issue and as a result was expelled from the Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) caucus. He continues to maintain that dual citizenship should be possible only for those with a real link to another country such as permanent residence or close family relations, saying that those who do not meet any of these conditions should automatically lose their Slovak citizenship by accepting a foreign one.

This idea does not suit Most-Hid party whose representatives think the state should not punish its own citizens in this way, TASR wrote. Despite the current situation, Most-Hid will not obstruct parliament as it did earlier this month, said Most-Hid MP Gábor Gál.

"We won't do that because now everyone is searching for a way to address the issue and approach it with utmost responsibility," Gál added.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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