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Head of Slovakia’s Tax Directorate comments on audits of alleged VAT fraudster

Firms belonging to arrested businessman Mikuláš Vareha, suspected of committing major tax fraud, had been audited by Slovakia's tax authorities 851 times to date –with 616 of the audits still ongoing, the TASR newswire reported. "No bullying took place here," according to Miroslav Mikulčík, the head of the Slovak Tax Directorate."They were routine audits."

Firms belonging to arrested businessman Mikuláš Vareha, suspected of committing major tax fraud, had been audited by Slovakia's tax authorities 851 times to date –with 616 of the audits still ongoing, the TASR newswire reported.

"No bullying took place here," according to Miroslav Mikulčík, the head of the Slovak Tax Directorate."They were routine audits."

However, he noted that such a huge number of audits means that the audit system has shortcomings and that the authorities very likely acted too late and were not well organised.

Mikulčík described the businessman's fraudulent practices as "absolutely absurd", as he is alleged to have been basically doing business with himself.

"The businessman had no respect for tax authorities ... actually using them to finance his business activities," said the director.

Last week police in eastern Slovakia arrested the businessman and he is suspected of committing VAT fraud amounting to almost €29 million.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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