Poll finds euro is welcomed by those young and successful but disliked by others

Most Slovaks remain satisfied with the decision to adopt the common European currency in January 2009 but their assessment is 12 percentage points less positive than it was a year ago, according to the results of an opinion poll conducted by the Focus agency published on March 7, the TASR newswire reported. The poll was conducted among a sample of 1,022 respondents at the beginning of February. Pavol Dianiška from Focus told TASR that adoption of the euro was viewed most positively by people aged 18-24, businesspeople, experts and clerks, people from Bratislava, and those earning higher salaries.

Most Slovaks remain satisfied with the decision to adopt the common European currency in January 2009 but their assessment is 12 percentage points less positive than it was a year ago, according to the results of an opinion poll conducted by the Focus agency published on March 7, the TASR newswire reported.

The poll was conducted among a sample of 1,022 respondents at the beginning of February. Pavol Dianiška from Focus told TASR that adoption of the euro was viewed most positively by people aged 18-24, businesspeople, experts and clerks, people from Bratislava, and those earning higher salaries.

Conversely, those most likely to be negative about the euro were people over 55, pensioners, people who do not vote in elections, and those from households with low incomes.

According to this poll, 63 percent of Slovaks assess the adoption of the euro positively (21 percent were definitely positive and 42 were rather positive). A negative opinion was held by 34 percent of the respondents (12 percent were definitely negative and 22 percent were rather negative).

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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