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Education Minister says Slovak education system can be among Europe’s best

Slovakia aims to build one of the best educational systems in Europe, Education Minister Eugen Jurzyca told journalists on March 7 during a news conference discussing the results of the OECD’s PISA 2009 survey, which assessed the performance of Slovak and foreign students in reading, mathematics and science, the TASR newswire reported. Slovakia may not be one of the richest OECD countries but nothing prevents it from having one of the best educational systems in the medium term, Jurzyca said, adding that the OECD's study showed that quality education is not only a question of finances.

Slovakia aims to build one of the best educational systems in Europe, Education Minister Eugen Jurzyca told journalists on March 7 during a news conference discussing the results of the OECD’s PISA 2009 survey, which assessed the performance of Slovak and foreign students in reading, mathematics and science, the TASR newswire reported.

Slovakia may not be one of the richest OECD countries but nothing prevents it from having one of the best educational systems in the medium term, Jurzyca said, adding that the OECD's study showed that quality education is not only a question of finances.

"It's a question of the system – 96 percent the system," said Jurzyca, as quoted by TASR. He added that the area of reading literacy needs to be improved first as around 70 percent of Slovak students do not understand the texts they read.

"This is terrible in both professional and personal life. We want to tackle this," the minister said, pointing to methods that have worked in other countries that should be implemented in Slovakia. Jurzyca said that he is taking the results of the PISA survey "deadly seriously" and praised the project saying, "We want to learn our lesson from it and work on improvements".

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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