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Concert for Japan organised by Slovak musicians

On Friday, April 1, a benefit concert for Japan will take place in the Large Evangelical (Protestant) Church in Bratislava. The main initiator of the event, violinist and Academy of Fine Arts' student Mária Vaculová, told the SITA newswire that many people worldwide wanted to help earthquake-stricken Japan and musicians were best able to do so through music. She therefore decided to organise a concert, the proceeds of which will go – through the Slovak Red Cross – to help those affected. Slovak Prime Minister Iveta Radičová has agreed to be the patron of the event.

On Friday, April 1, a benefit concert for Japan will take place in the Large Evangelical (Protestant) Church in Bratislava. The main initiator of the event, violinist and Academy of Fine Arts' student Mária Vaculová, told the SITA newswire that many people worldwide wanted to help earthquake-stricken Japan and musicians were best able to do so through music. She therefore decided to organise a concert, the proceeds of which will go – through the Slovak Red Cross – to help those affected. Slovak Prime Minister Iveta Radičová has agreed to be the patron of the event.

Vaculová managed to get popular artists like Martin Valihora, Mária Čírová, Anita Soul, Oskar Rózsa, the Hope Gospel Singers gospel choir led by Iveta Viskupová, Eugen Vizváry, members of the Slovak Philharmonic, the Opera of the Slovak National Theatre (SND) and the Christian Chamber Orchestra Zoe to perform. Admission is voluntary and the concert begins at 18:00.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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