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Sulík apologises to Lazár for untrue remarks

Speaker of Parliament Richard Sulík (SaS) on Thursday, March 24, apologised to Smer MP and former boss of the Košice Heating Plant (TEKO) Ladislav Lazár for untrue remarks he had made concerning Lazár's salary as TEKO general director.

Speaker of Parliament Richard Sulík (SaS) on Thursday, March 24, apologised to Smer MP and former boss of the Košice Heating Plant (TEKO) Ladislav Lazár for untrue remarks he had made concerning Lazár's salary as TEKO general director.

"I personally apologise to my colleague Lazár for my having published untrue information. I'm sorry," Sulík said in parliament, adding that he had already apologised to Lazár personally.

"If you insist on my apology on TV Markíza, let me know," said Sulík, as quoted by the TASR newswire. In early March, Sulík said on the private TV station that Lazár's monthly salary was reduced by nearly a half – to €2,400 – only a month before the June 2010 general election. Lazár called on Sulík, who he claims deliberately lied about his salary, to officially apologise to him on TV, otherwise he intended to press charges. "He knew very well that my salary went down 15 months before the elections, when I had no idea of ever becoming an MP." Lazár says he received a lower salary as of 2009, in the wake of the economic crisis.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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