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Slovak Parliament condemns Lukashenko's ‘abuse of power’

The Slovak Parliament views the violence used to suppress a gathering at October Square in Minsk on December 19, 2010, as a gross abuse of political and police powers by the Belarus regime against an innocent and defenceless population.

The Slovak Parliament views the violence used to suppress a gathering at October Square in Minsk on December 19, 2010, as a gross abuse of political and police powers by the Belarus regime against an innocent and defenceless population.

This was the key message of a statement passed by parliament on Tuesday, March 29. As many as 105 lawmakers voted for the statement to be approved, the TASR newswire wrote. In the document, among other things, MPs called on the Belarusian president, Alexander Lukashenko, to immediately release political prisoners and cancel penalties for all Belarusian citizens prosecuted as a result of the gathering. Parliament also called on the Slovak Government and President Ivan Gašparovič to use bilateral and multilateral avenues to call on the Belarusian authorities to release political prisoners in the country.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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